Author: Green New Deal Network Staff    Published: 4/16/2021           THRIVE

Three Strategic Pillars

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Narrative Change

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Powerful Coalitions

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Electoral Engagement

We will change the narrative by investing in movements. We invest in and support creative and disruptive movements that can dramatically change public opinion and what’s politically possible.

We will advocate and win transformative policy changes by building powerful grassroots coalitions that organize grassroots activists at the local, state, and national level. Our state coalitions build power by campaigning on and organizing for precedent-setting policies, and they also mobilize together to pressure for federal action, such as the THRIVE Agenda.

We will expand the mandate through direct participation in elections.

WHO ARE WE?

The Green New Deal Network is a 50-state campaign with a national table of 15 organizations: Center for Popular Democracy, Climate Justice Alliance, Grassroots Global Justice Alliance, Greenpeace, Indigenous Environmental Network, Indivisible, Movement for Black Lives, MoveOn, People’s Action, Right To The City Alliance, Service Employees International Union, Sierra Club, Sunrise Movement, US Climate Action Network, and the Working Families Party.

The THRIVE Act

We have a once-in-a-generation chance for Congress to pass a transformational economic recovery package that puts over 15 million people to work in family-sustaining, union jobs across the economy — from clean energy to care work to manufacturing — to cut climate pollution in half by2030 and advance gender, environmental, Indigenous, economic, and racial justice, with particular attention to Black and Indigenous people. It’s called the THRIVE Act.

This bill offers a blueprint for economic renewal backed by a movement of movements, including unions, racial justice, climate, and other grassroots groups. The THRIVE Act will be introduced in Congress in April 2021. The THRIVE Act’s lead sponsors are Sens. Ed Markey and Jeff Merkley, and Reps. Debbie Dingell, Ilhan Omar, Jamaal Bowman, Pramila Jayapal, Earl Blumenauer, Ro Khanna, Yvette Clarke, and Nanette Barragán.

We have a once-in-a-generation chance for Congress to pass a transformational economic recovery package that puts
over 15 million people to work in family-sustaining, union jobs across the economy — from care work to
manufacturing— to cut climate pollution in half by2030 and advance gender, environmental, Indigenous, economic,
and racial justice, with particular attention to Black and Indigenous people.It’s called the THRIVE Act.This bill
offers a blueprint for economic renewal backed by a movement of movements, including unions, racialjustice,
climate, and other grassroots groups. The THRIVE Act will be introduced in Congress in April 2021. TheTHRIVE
Act’s lead sponsors are Sens. Ed Markey and Jeff Merkley,and Reps. Debbie Dingell, Ilhan Omar, Jamaal Bowman,
Pramila Jayapal, Earl Blumenauer, Ro Khanna, Yvette Clarke, and Nanette Barraǵan.

We have a once-in-a-generation chance for Congress to pass a transformational economic recovery package that puts
over 15 million people to work in family-sustaining, union jobs across the economy — from care work to
manufacturing— to cut climate pollution in half by2030 and advance gender, environmental, Indigenous, economic,
and racial justice, with particular attention to Black and Indigenous people.It’s called the THRIVE Act.This bill
offers a blueprint for economic renewal backed by a movement of movements, including unions, racialjustice,
climate, and other grassroots groups. The THRIVE Act will be introduced in Congress in April 2021. TheTHRIVE
Act’s lead sponsors are Sens. Ed Markey and Jeff Merkley,and Reps. Debbie Dingell, Ilhan Omar, Jamaal Bowman,
Pramila Jayapal, Earl Blumenauer, Ro Khanna, Yvette Clarke, and Nanette Barraǵan.

What’s in the THRIVE Act?

I. INVESTMENT ATTHE SCALE OF THE CRISES WE FACE,WHILE DISTRIBUTING POWER
We need an economic renewal plan as big and interconnected as the crises we face. The THRIVE Act puts forth a bold
investment package where impacted communities play a leading role in building a more just economy.
● The THRIVE Act authorizes investments of at least$1 trillion per year for FY 2022-2031. New economic
modeling shows that this is the scale of investment we need to create more than 15 million good jobs and end the
unemployment crisis, while cutting climate pollution in half by 2030 and confronting systemic racism and gender,
economic, and environmental injustice.
● Honoring frontline leadership. The bill creates a THRIVE Board of representatives from impacted communities,
unions, and Indigenous Nations to guide the $1 trillion per year in new investments. The Board will enable
communities that have faced chronic underinvestment to take the reins and reorient investments toward justice. Those
on the frontlines of historic pollution, the climate crisis, and economic insecurity must be on the forefront of building a
more just economy, while also leading the fight against systemic racism and other social injustices.
● Economy-wide investments to take on injustice, pollution, and joblessness wherever we find it.The bill
includes investments to upgrade our infrastructure for clean water, affordable public transit, and a reliable electric grid
(creating 5 million jobs); to expand access to wind and solar power, electric vehicles, and healthy buildings (creating 4
million jobs); to protect our rural and urban spaces, wetlands, prairies, and forests and support family farmers who are
embracing regenerative agriculture (creating 4 million jobs); and to invest in public institutions and care for children
and the elderly — essential work that is underpaid and largely performed by women of color (creating 2 million jobs).
● Respecting Indigenous sovereignty. The bill requires the U.S. federal government to respect the sovereignty of
Indigenous Nations in making these investments, which means honoring the U.S. government’s trust responsibilities
and requiring the free, prior, and informed consent of Tribes for all investments affecting them.
● At least 50% of investments for frontline communities.The bill requires that at least half of the new investments
directly benefit frontline communities that have borne the brunt of systemic racism, environmental injustice, and
economic exclusion, including Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Arab, Asian, and Pacific Islander communities.

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II. STRONG LABOR, EQUITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS TO BUILD A MORE JUSTECONOMY
Economic analysis shows that, without strong labor, equity, and environmental standards, investments would reinforce the
unjust status quo by creating millions of mediocre, non-union jobs for predominantly white men. To build a just economy, the
Thrive Act requires strong wage and benefit guarantees, access to unions, equitable hiring that favors women and Black,
Indigenous, and people of color, and environmental justice standards to ensure that investments repair, rather than add to,
historic harms.
● To ensure jobs created by the Act meet high-road labor standards, and boost workers’ rights to form a union,
the THRIVE Act:
● Invests in quality, family-sustaining jobs, defined as jobs which provide (a) family-sustaining wages and benefits
(at least $15 per hour, or the prevailing wage, whichever is higher), (b) the right of workers to form or join a
union and engage in collective bargaining free of harassment and intimidation, (c) child care support; (d) at
least twelve weeks of paid family leave; (e) at least two weeks of paid sick leave; (f) at least two weeks of paid
vacation per year; and (g) robust worker safety standards. Critically, the bill includes all care workers and
agricultural workers in worker protections.
● Strengthens workers’ power and supports domestic job creation using provisions such as Buy America and
other domestic content standards, community benefits agreements, local hire standards, high road training
partnerships, and Project Labor Agreements
● Requires investment criteria that advance key provisions included in the PRO Act (H.R. 842) and the Public
Service Freedom to Negotiate Act, such as stronger and swifter remedies when employers interfere with
workers’ rights; expanded freedom to organize without employer interference; first contract arbitration;
allowing fair share agreements; protected strikes and other protest activity; and expansion of organizing and
bargaining rights
● The THRIVE Act invests in historically underserved and impacted communities, including, but not limited
to Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Arab, Asian, and Pacific Islander communities, to build power and counteract
racial, ethnic, gender, and other social and economicinjustices. The Act:
● Ensures that no investment harms historically underserved and disadvantaged communities, using provisions
such as equity assessments, guardrails against displacement of existing residents or community-serving
businesses, and provisions to ensure communities have the power to democratically plan, implement, and
administer projects
● Addresses historic discriminatory practices in hiring, investment, and procurement by prioritizing local and
equitable hiring and contracting, including Ban the Box and other fair hire provisions that support
traditionally marginalized workers
● Drives funding toward an an array of priority investments in disadvantaged communities, while increasing
educational opportunities that prepare historically marginalized and disadvantaged youth for high-quality jobs
● To strengthen and heal the nation-to-nation relationshipwith sovereign American Indian and Alaska Native
tribes, the THRIVE Act:
● Ensures that Federal agencies extend regulatory and adjudicatory authority related to treaty reserved rights and
recognized customary rights to off reservation lands, waters, and villages; preserve and protect sacred and
cultural sites of significance; adequately and equitably address the violence against Indigenous women, trans
women and femmes, and children, inclusive of the inherent authority of American Indian and Alaska Native
tribes in this regard

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● Expands funding to tribes and Indigenous communities for recovery and relief to build sustainable economies
and jobs based upon the principles of Indigenous just transition. This includes prioritizing equitable
investments in tribe and local community-based projects that contribute to improved infrastructure, health
care, clean water and sanitation, food sovereignty and agroecological farming; environmental and ecosystems
management, clean-up, and remediation of contaminated and hazardous sites; local and community-based
housing and renewable energy; and innovative and alternative community-based housing programs based upon
traditional Indigenous design, use of local natural materials, and localized training and employment.
● To combat environmental injustice and ensure healthylives for all, the THRIVE Act:
● Promotes meaningful involvement by impacted communities — especially vulnerable environmental justice
communities — in program implementation, in line with Jemez Principles for Democratic Organizing
● Tackles toxic pollution by holding corporations accountable, reducing pollution at source and strengthening
the regulation of, and accounting for, cumulative health impacts
● Prioritizes investment in remediation of polluted sites in environmental justice communities and expands
equitable access to public health resources in historically underserved and impacted communities, recognizing
the disproportionate burden of health impacts in these communities and the historic disinvestment in public
health resources
● To avert f urther climate and environmental catastrophe,the THRIVE Act:
● Authorizes the necessary spending to meet ambitious climate targets, including the emissions reductions
necessary to stay below 1.5 degrees of global warming; 100% clean energy by 2035, 100% zero-emission new
buildings by 2025; and putting the majority of Americans within walking distance of high-quality, affordable,
clean public transit by 2030
● Makes funding conditional on passing an environmental justice screen and ensuring that investments do not
displace workers or depress wages and benefits due to increased costs associated with participating in a program
● Ensures that investments under this Act do not expand fossil fuel infrastructure, the use of emissions offsets, or
geoengineering; and requires the use of climate-resilient designs for infrastructure and high environmental
standards for materials
● To ensure fairness for workers and communities affected by economic transitions, the THRIVE Act:
● Directs investments to support displaced workers, including 5 years of wage and benefit replacement, housing
assistance, fully funded pensions, crisis and trauma and early retirement support, skills training, education, and
equitable job placement
● Directs funding to cover local budget shortfalls; economic diversification, including to address historic
injustices, as defined by community and worker-led planning processes; physical and social infrastructure;
retooling and conversion, reclamation, and remediation of closed and abandoned facilities and sites
● The THRIVE Act reinvests in public institutions that enable workers and communities to thrive. The Act:
● Prevents privatization of any public lands, water, natural resources, or existing public sector jobs
● Directs funding to support and expand public health care systems, public education and other public services
at the state and local level to address the health, environmental and socio-economic impacts of climate crises;
and toward institutional reforms to make government investments more coordinated, effective, accountable to
disadvantaged communities, and suited to taking on the full scale of the major challenges of the coming decade